.30-06 SPRINGFIELD

Originally developed in 1903, with modern dimensions standardized in 1906 by the military as the �ball cartridge, caliber .30, Model of 1906�, this cartridge served the United States through two world wars, the Korean war, and into Vietnam, resulting in it being the most popular centerfire cartridge ever introduced in the United States. It has been offered in every conceivable type of firearm in existence from single shot and lever action rifles, to semi-automatics and belt fed machine guns.

Because of the huge array of .308 diameter bullets available (from 100 � 240 grains in weight) the .30-06�s versatility is unmatched as far as hunting goes. It provides enough power along with that versatility in bullet weights to take on any game in North America while keeping recoil to a tolerable level.

All of the loads developed for this page were developed for, and using, vintage WWI and WWII military rifles, and all are safe for these classic long arms. However, the 220gr Norma load is intended for use in manually operated guns because of the high pressures and excessive recoil generated compared to original military loadings. Hot loads such as this can bend, or in rare cases even break the operating rod on the M1 Garand simply due to higher pressures and due to different pressure curves from the slower burning IMR 4064 powder. All loads listed using IMR 4895 are optimal in the M1 rifle, as IMR 4895 was the original military powder used to load service cartridges. The lower charges (44-47grains) are great for target shooting at the range while producing lower pressures for decreasing wear and tear on the vintage M1�s, while also cycling the actions on the M1 and Browning Automatic Rifle (BAR). However, higher powder charges of IMR 4895 (47 grains and above) were noted to be needed to cycle the author�s M1919A4 belt fed machine gun because of its recoil operation. 50 grains of IMR 4895 with the M2 FMJ flat based bullet is an identical copy of the military service round and will operate flawlessly in all weapon platforms.

IMR 4895
Powder Charge (in grains) Projectile Primer Case Cartridge Overall Length Average Velocity from 24" barrel
44.0 147gr FMJBT M80 military Remington large rifle Remington 3.275" 2497fps
47.0 147gr FMJBT M80 military Remington large rifle Remington 3.275" 2590fps
47.0 168gr Sierra MatchKing BTHP CCI #34 large rifle NATO Lake City military 3.300" 2538fps
48.0 152gr FMJFB M2 military CCI #34 large rifle NATO Lake City military 3.300" 2624fps
49.0 152gr FMJFB M2 military CCI #34 large rifle NATO Lake City military 3.300" 2656fps
49.0 150gr tracer military CCI #34 large rifle NATO Lake City military 3.300" 2761fps
50.0 152gr FMJFB M2 military CCI #34 large rifle NATO Lake City military 3.300" 2758fps
The classic M1 (Garand) rifle of WWII and Korea War era as used in testing.
Another U.S. military classic: the WWI-WWII era M1903 Springfield.
IMR 4064
Powder Charge (in grains) Projectile Primer Case Cartridge Overall Length Average Velocity from 24" barrel
44.0 220gr Norma RNFB Remington large rifle Remington 3.230" 2326fps
A comparison of rifle cartridges; .30-06 is 5th from the left (the tallest one).
The author's favorite gun in his collection: the M1918A2 Browning Automatic Rifle.
IMR Trailboss (Reduced recoil loads, will not cycle semi-auto)
Powder Charge (in grains) Projectile Primer Case Cartridge Overall Length Average Velocity from 16" barrel
18.0 110gr RNFB .30 carbine military Remington large rifle Remington 2.990" 1812fps
A Browning M1919A4 as used in testing.